international broadcasting

P.J. Crowley

GW Professor and former Assistant Secretary of State for Public Affairs on his most recent book, Red Line.

The CEO of the Broadcasting Board of Governors (BBG), the parent organization for the Voice of America, told a panel commemorating World Press Freedom Day that there is a war of information happening in the world. The BBG and George Washington University's School for Media and Public Affairs organized the panel in Washington on Monday to discuss the challenges of international journalism, the rise of fake news and how media can establish credibility.

A roundup of CPD blogs on international broadcasting in honor of World Press Freedom Day.

In one of the most remote communities in Australia, young filmmakers are sharing their stories and the world is watching. [...] Their videos capture snippets of life in the Anangu Pitjantjatjara Yankunytjatjara lands, in central Australia. It's a closed Indigenous community, open to few visitors. There's also no mobile phone reception and few homes have access to the internet. Leo says the short clips have captured the attention of viewers in many far off places.

Taiwan should be the regional leader in soft diplomacy as well. It has plenty to offer the world. Taiwan is the only Chinese-speaking democratic nation in the world, its press is unrestricted, and its citizens enjoy total online freedom. Add into this the fact that it has consistently punched above its weight economically and Taiwan has plenty to take to the wider world to counter-weight the obvious diplomatic difficulties that they face.

A high-profile media forum to be held in Dubai next week will feature an Arab News panel discussion examining the region’s image abroad. [...] A report titled “The Arab Image in the US” will be unveiled at the event. It is based on an exclusive survey of how the American public views the Arab world, conducted in partnership between Arab News, the Dubai Press Club and research and polling specialist YouGov.

“North Korea now has the goal of developing the nuclear weapons by itself and also pursues other conflicting goals like improving the economy and foreign relations,” MOU spokesperson Lee Duk-haeng told media at a regular news briefing. [...] Cheong added that the members of the organization have been key figures in negotiations with the South, U.S. Diplomacy, and public diplomacy.

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