international broadcasting

December 19, 2017

A new book explores international broadcasting and media from a Chinese perspective.

They were turning away Russian reporters Thursday at the State Duma, Russia's lower house of parliament. But when I showed up, I flashed my accreditation card and a big American smile and walked right in. That's because of something that rarely gets mentioned about Russia: A correspondent accredited with U.S. media here can enjoy privileges that his Russian media counterparts can only dream about.

Russia's lower house of parliament on Wednesday banned Voice of America and Radio Free Europe/Radio Liberty from entering its premises, a day after the Russian government declared the organizations "foreign agents."  The 413-1 vote by the Russian State Duma to ban the outlets came as Moscow followed through on its promise to retaliate for similar U.S. actions against the English-language Russian network RT, which Russian leaders characterize as an assault on freedom of the press.

Read about the Trump administration's handling of the BBG/VOA, Russian disinformation, and our newest CPD research fellows in this month's roundup.

In Part II of a two-part series, Dan Robinson looks at recent events involving the Broadcasting Board of Governors' oversight of Voice of America.

In Part I of a two-part series, Dan Robinson looks at recent events involving the Broadcasting Board of Governors' oversight of Voice of America.

Russian lawmakers voted unanimously Wednesday to pass legislation allowing authorities to force any foreign media organization to register as a "foreign agent" under penalty of fines or a possible ban on operations in Russia. The legislation, passed 414 to 0 in retaliation for the registration of English-language Russian news network RT under a similar statute in the United States, was drafted hastily and is likely to be signed into law by Russian President Vladi­mir Putin by the end of the month.

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