journalism

Journalist Atem, who wants to keep her identity obscure, writes of Libyan life without Moammar Gadhafi. Atem is 17 years old. Before the uprising began, she was finishing her last year in high school and acting very much her age.

When CBS Evening News anchor Katie Couric addresses Tufts students and community members this afternoon as part of the sixth annual Edward R. Murrow Forum on Issues in Journalism, she will be joining a canon of prominent journalists who have been invited to the Hill to carry on the excitement for journalism to which the forum's namesake devoted himself.

Building on the Obama administration's efforts to improve relations between the United States and Russia, a group of prominent media leaders from the two nations have come up with their own ideas to confront stereotypes and increase mutual understanding.

During recent testimony in front of the Senate's Foreign Relations Committee Secretary of State Clinton made a splash when she commented, "I remember having an Afghan general tell me that the only thing he thought about Americans is that all the men wrestled and the women walked around in bikinis because the only TV he ever saw was Baywatch and World Wide Wrestling.” She went on to comment about the effect American media has on the image of the U.S. abroad. Predictably, the significance of her remarks were lost in the usual cacophony of howls about Al Jazeera and Russian media.

Journalists in Turkey marched in protest on Friday after police arrested 10 reporters and writers, detentions that prompted the European Commission to warn the EU candidate country over its democratic credentials.

PDiN Monitor Editorial Staff
Sherine B. Walton, Editor-in-Chief
Naomi Leight, Managing Editor
Marissa Cruz-Enriquez, Associate Editor

Wikileaks may be a shock to the system, but it also might bring certain public diplomacy benefits.

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