north korea

The release of classified U.S. material by Wikileaks has been characterized in a negative light – as an embarrassment to the U.S. administration and a threat to U.S. national security and the international community at large. As former U.S. government officials who worked on North Korea (DPRK) for the National Security Council and for the Office of Korean Affairs at the U.S. Department of State, it is crucial to underscore the impact these leaks have had on efforts to work with other countries to address common problems.

The latest WikiLeaks release suggests that China is trying to distance itself from the North Korean regime and may be struggling to rein in the country, which is heavily dependent on China.

With North Korea reeling from economic and succession crises, American and South Korean officials early this year secretly began gaming out what would happen if the North, led by one of the world’s most brutal family dynasties, collapsed.

The nuclear-powered aircraft carrier USS George Washington and its escorts are heading for the waters off the Korean peninsula, in the aftermath of the flare-up between North and South Korea. This is very much gunboat diplomacy 21st Century-style.

Just after artillery fire at the divided Korean Peninsula border struck a hard blow to international relations, filmmakers from Beijing presented a gift celebrating soft power to North Korean leader and cinephile Kim Jong-Il.

November 8, 2010

Koreans, both individually and collectively, have lingering concerns about their country’s international image. Their national identity is blurred by the existence of two larger neighbors whose culture and history are better known to the world.

In previous editions, the Asian Games have provided fertile ground for the two Koreas to engage in sports diplomacy as they seek to repair ties 60 years after war broke out between north and south.

It was shot on a cheap camera by a man who goes by the pseudonym Kim Dong-cheol, a North Korean with a double life. In addition to his job as a driver for a company, Kim also works as a clandestine reporter for AsiaPress, a Japanese news agency that's taken advantage of the digital electronics revolution to get reports from inside North Korea.

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