power

However you define it, power is important because it allows you to get things done.  Whether you are a politician or an executive, you must seek power to achieve objectives.  Yet power never stays constant, but has always been highly dependent on context and, in today’s world of rapidly shifting contexts, emerging sources of power are often the most potent.

Huffington Post readers may be familiar with Arianna Huffington’s campaign to redefine success away from the two metrics of money and power toward a third which includes well-being, wisdom, and our ability to wonder and give back. The old, masculine signifiers of success lead to burnout, sleep deprivation and general grumpiness. Businesses should instead take care of their workforce, and indeed encourage their workers to take care of themselves.

Huffington Post readers may be familiar with Arianna Huffington’s campaign to redefine success away from the two metrics of money and power toward a third which includes well-being, wisdom, and our ability to wonder and give back. The old, masculine signifiers of success lead to burnout, sleep deprivation and general grumpiness. Businesses should instead take care of their workforce, and indeed encourage their workers to take care of themselves. A healthy, happy, motivated workforce should be a symbol of success in its own right.

India’s policymakers have been fixated with pursuing major strategic ambitions with the hopes of one day becoming a superpower.... It has been lobbying for a permanent seat on the United Nations Security Council and it has been trying to raise its profile globally through public diplomacy and events such as the Commonwealth Games.

...ICCR president Karan Singh said people have begun to think and talk about the day when India would emerge as a superpower, but its fundamental mantras are embedded in the simultaneous growth and expansion of the country... In all the countries of East Asia, South Asia and South East Asia, strong presence and influence of Hinduism, Buddhism and Indian culture had been found, he said.

razil and Turkey are two nations that espouse soft power as a means of winning influence on the global stage. Both countries seek friendly relations with their neighbors, even when neighbors behave badly on the international scene.

India's attempts to increase its “soft power” will only translate into something meaningful if it uses this power in a more systematic and planned way, improving its economic performance, suggests author Mr Nicholas Blarel.

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