refugee crisis

For the 85,000 refugees who will resettle in the US this year, mobile phones have become as essential to their daily lives as a safe, clean place to live and a steady job. [...] Mobile and internet services are now on the list of necessities. They not only keep new immigrants in touch with their families back home, but they also provide an important gateway for managing finances and sending cash home to relatives.

Refugees Welcome, by Raven Hawks

What happens when the government is sending one message, and citizens are sending another?

A year has passed since Germany opened its doors to hundreds of thousands of refugees and Chancellor Angela Merkel uttered her famous mantra – Wir schaffen das. We can do it. Her critics at home have grown louder over the past year [...] But how has the refugee crisis impacted Germany's international reputation as a steadfast ally, an economic powerhouse and a country with a troubled history?

Uganda is one of the most favourable environments in the world for refugees, according to the UNHCR. While many countries keep refugees in camps away from citizens, Uganda allows them to set up businesses, work for others, and move freely around the country.

Sport, as the virtuous expression of human self-improvement, honors standing in direct contact with another in the context of values ​​and respect, to seek becoming a better person. Humanitarianism and Olympism share the universal ideals of respect and dignity. Their opposites, terrorism, prejudice and violence are today our main challenges. Perhaps we should see in Olympism and the principles of humanitarianism a tool for reconciliation between peoples and a solution to these conflicts.

PD News headlines focused on the role of public diplomacy in empowering vulnerable populations. 

A Taiwanese is among 25 musicians from 17 countries and territories selected to participate in an international exchange program organized by the U.S. State Department to promote musical collaboration and people-to-people exchanges, the American Institute in Taiwan (AIT) said Thursday.

That wireless network, called "Jungala," is beamed into the camp from a crude but serviceable hand-built antenna that sits atop a battered blue truck once used to transport horses. It's called the Refugee Info Bus and it's run by a charity group called Help Refugees. Jungala, the Afghan name for the camp, serves as a lifeline for its occupants, with as many as 400 people logging on every day. 

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