refugee crisis

The team, comprised of ten refugee athletes from Syria, South Sudan, Ethiopia and the Democratic Republic of the Congo, will compete in the Rio 2016 Olympics and march in the Opening Ceremony tomorrow. The International Olympic Committee is funding the team to draw attention to the global refugee crisis. UNHCR released a 90-second film about the refugee athletes today, which is hosted on the organisation’s YouTube page. 

At the forefront of the crisis, Palestinians from the humanitarian organization Humanity Crew can be found dealing with the most harrowing scenes to hit European shores in modern history. Launched less than a year ago in Haifa as a response to the Syrian war, the organization is leading the way in delivering mental health and psychosocial support to refugees from Syria to Sudan.

Anjelina Nada Lohalith, who will compete in the 1,500-meter run, told reporters at Rio’s Tom Jobim airport that participating at the games was “really important, because I know I am going to represent thousands of refugees from around the world.”

The five founding members of Ithaca Welcomes Refugees might be the human embodiment of the “COEXIST” bumper sticker. They are: two protestant pastors, a Muslim American, a Jewish social studies teacher, and an aid worker who married into a Hindu family. [...] With the current Syrian crisis in mind, the city’s Common Council unanimously voted in June to declare Ithaca a welcoming community for all refugees.

A Syrian group is using the Pokemon Go craze to call attention to the plight of children in their war-torn country. The Revolutionary Forces of Syria media office has tweeted a series of photos of children holding photos with Pokemon Go images and signs with messages like, “I am in Syria. Save me. 

This chance meeting in the depths of a Berlin winter marked the start of a new phase in Syrian refugee Abdallah’s life. [...] “Our concerts are a piece of Syria in Berlin,” said Abdallah, 28, who fled growing violence near his home in Aleppo, north-western Syria, and arrived at a shelter outside the German capital last October.

The Council of Bars and Law Societies of Europe (CCBE) and the Deutscher Anwaltverein (DAV) have launched their joint European Lawyers in Lesvos project, aimed at providing legal assistance to migrants requiring international protection. [...] The purpose of the project is to give migrants and refugees the chance to receive individual legal advice from a lawyer – crucial at a time of great uncertainty amongst the more than 4,000 on the island as to their legal entitlements.

While working for a Turkish tech firm, Akil learned how to program for mobile phones, and decided to make a smartphone app to help Syrians get all the information they need to build new lives in Turkey. In early 2014, he and a friend launched Gherbtna, named for an Arabic word referring to the loneliness of foreign exile. [...] “Our ultimate dream for Gherbtna is to reach all refugees around the world, and help them.”

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