religion

After decades of neglect by policy-makers, religion is once again a legitimate topic of conversation in public diplomacy, international relations and domestic affairs. Much of the current discourse has been sparked by what is viewed as widespread religious resurgence that has diminished the force of the secularization hypothesis. This new perspective on religiosity is prompting diplomats to increase their religious literacy and to explore ways to harness the religious communities’ potential for problem solving, development and collaboration.

Faith-based Engagement as a Tool for Public Diplomacy

A recent journey to Auschwitz with some 200 leaders from across the Muslim and Arab world, with 10 of the camp’s survivors, was remarkable, making it clear that Iranian President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad was not speaking in the name of all Muslims when he made perverse declared the Holocaust a “myth.”

Day to day we each have our routines and along the way are bombarded by images, messages, and endless information. But what breaks through the information overload and influences us? What captures our attention, our imagination and ultimately lodges itself in our memory?

I’ve been thinking a lot lately on what influences us. Day to day we each have our routines and along the way are bombarded by images, messages, and endless information. But what breaks through the information overload and influences us? What captures our attention, our imagination and ultimately lodges itself in our memory? Maybe I’m paying closer attention to the details of everyday more acutely after reading Joe Nye’s latest book The Future of Power.

The State Department has a "rigidly narrow" view of diplomacy that neglects religion's role in foreign affairs, a prominent Catholic ambassador charged on Sunday (April 17) as he announced his resignation.

That the true intentions of a religious organization, the Muslim Brotherhood, would become the most hotly debated issue surrounding the overthrow of Egypt's president, Hosni Mubarak, would have garnered guffaws among Western intellectuals only four decades ago.

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