vietnam

A cultural, sports and tourism exchange programme between Vietnamese and Lao border provinces will take place from August 16 in Vietnam’s central provinces of Nghe An, Quang Binh and Ha Tinh and Laos’ Xiengkhoang, Bolykhamsay and Khammouan provinces.

July 12, 2012

The Obama Administration's State Department hasn't been an especially strong advocate for human rights, as the recent mishandling of Chinese dissident's Chen Guangcheng's case made painfully clear. Now there's news of more fumbles—this time, in Vietnam.

Hoi An City will host the annual Hoi An-Japan Cultural Exchange on August 24-26, the local culture and sport centre said yesterday. The event will mark the 39th anniversary of diplomatic ties between Viet Nam and Japan (1973-2012) and lead up to their Year of Friendship in 2013.

The action film Ranh Gioi Trang Den (Boundary of Black and White), which marks the first co-operation between the Vietnamese and Indonesian film industries, will hit screens on July 6.

More recently, with the resurgence of China as a global power, Vietnam has been subject to a Chinese “charm offensive,” as the country seeks to spread its soft power. Since the early 1990s, Vietnam has been engulfed in a Chinese “cultural tsunami” brought about by the overwhelming success of Chinese historical television series, music, movies and kung-fu novels.

Vietnam did a great job in 2011 to promote its land and people. Various activities were held on the theme of building a shared awareness of cultural integration and combining cultural diplomacy with political and economic diplomacy. In 2012 the country will continue to use diplomacy to foster its culture.

The event "is in itself an excellent example of important public diplomacy exchanges in the EU-Vietnam relation,” said Mr. Franz Jessen, ambassador – head of the Delegation of the European Union in Vietnam.

The relevant Chinese government departments should think about how to deal with overseas publicity and public diplomacy in Vietnam: winning hearts and minds, especially of the post-Vietnam-War generation, who have a much more favorable impression of the U.S., than of China.

Pages