brexit

Iran’s ambassador to UK said, diplomacy remained as the most influential factor in soft power. [...] “Presently, detailed daily discussions are underway in Britain on role of diplomats in the European country’s decisive negotiations indicating that politicians are faced with challenged while appointing the right type of person who simultaneously possesses relevant experience and knowledge,” 

The British public is fearful of the rise of fascism around the world in the wake of Donald Trump’s election victory in the US and the Brexit referendum in the UK, according to a new survey released today. The study by BMG Research for ‘The Independent’ newspaper also showed that most people think the number of individuals holding fascist views is increasing in the UK and on the continent as well.

Young people in some countries in Europe believe that the UK is less attractive since its decision to leave the European Union, [...] a new poll has found. Initial results of the survey of nearly 40,000 people aged between 18 and 34 years carried out for the British Council by Ipsos MORI show some significant negative shifts in the EU countries towards the UK’s attractiveness 

The Welsh Government has committed to establishing an equivalent to Creative England as part of its bid to become the "most creatively active nation in Europe". Welsh economy and infrastructure secretary Ken Skates pledged to set up the body, called Creative Wales, in a new report that sets out a vision for Wales' cultural future. 

The English Premier League recently signed its biggest deal outside of the UK. Chinese electronics giant Suning has stumped up £560m for the television rights to broadcast its games to the growing legion of fans there. But it’s not just the size of the agreement that’s eye-catching. It’s a double display of soft power at work: by both China and the UK.

When Donald J Trump is sworn in on 20 January as the 45th President of the United States, the UK needs to make a choice. Trump’s unique and unpredictable blend of belligerence and isolationism means the US can no longer be relied on to defend the liberal, rules based international order in place since the end of the Second World War. This could mark the end of an era for UK foreign policy. 

May’s focus was on the need to ensure that the benefits of "liberalism and globalisation" are more evenly distributed.  For her, the EU referendum and the US presidential election should be read as wake-up call. Important as this analysis may be for electoral politics, it does not set out a clear road map for the UK’s future foreign policy.

In the next few years, the UK’s constitution will be re-shaped. As a nation, we are yet to recognise the enormity of this. It’s exciting - and terrifying. And this includes the BBC. Why? Not only because it is the single most important media operation in the country, but because it belongs to the peoples of these islands and is part of our informal constitution.

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